Admission for the September 2024 academic session is ongoing. Apply Now!

School of Management and Social Sciences

BSc. Entrepreneurship

This programme is designed to equip individuals with the knowledge and skills needed to embark on entrepreneurial ventures, focusing on the creation, management, and growth of successful businesses and startups.

Tuition Per Session

₦300,000

₦280,000

Tuition Per Semester

₦150,000

Introduction to BSc. Entrepreneurship

Start your bachelor’s degree in Entrepreneurship

Our Bachelor’s in Entrepreneurship programme is meticulously designed to arm you with the knowledge and skills essential for a thriving career in the field. With a robust focus on theoretical frameworks and practical implementations, this programme primes you to confront the multifaceted challenges of entrepreneurship in today’s dynamic business environment. Throughout this course, you will delve into entrepreneurship essentials, business development strategies, innovation, and venture management.

Upon graduation, you will be aptly equipped to pursue a spectrum of professional avenues in entrepreneurship, spearheading ventures, fostering innovation, and navigating the intricacies of business landscapes.

Our faculty members are distinguished, accomplished, and seasoned professionals in their domains. They bring a wealth of expertise and firsthand insights into the classroom. Their diverse backgrounds, spanning from industry veterans to seasoned academics, enrich the learning journey by offering pragmatic viewpoints and cutting-edge research. Learning under the guidance of these esteemed faculty members will cultivate in you a penchant for critical thinking, foster innovative ideation, and empower you to thrive in the dynamic realm of entrepreneurship.

Why you should apply for BSc. Entrepreneurship:

Applications for September 2024 admission is ongoing.

Apply before 30th September 2024, to secure your place. Discount applies for full year’s payment.

Programme Summary

Study Level

BSc. Entrepreneurship

Study Duration

8 Semesters

Mode of study

Blended Learning

Tuition per session

₦300,000

₦280,000

Tuition per semester

₦150,000

Curriculum

Programme Outline

Our curriculum is designed to provide students with the necessary competencies and insights crucial for success across a spectrum of roles in Entrepreneurship. The course encapsulates a comprehensive range of subjects, including strategic planning, operations management, marketing strategies, financial analysis, human resources, and leadership development.

1st SemesterUnits
Communication in English I2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify possible sound patterns in English;
  • List notable Language skills and classify word formation processes;
  • Construct simple and fairly complex sentences in English;
  • Apply logical and critical reasoning skills for meaningful presentations;
  • Demonstrate an appreciable level of the art of public speaking and listening; and
  • Write simple and technical reports.
Principles of Management2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of basic concepts related to management knowledge;
  • Explain the roles, skills, and functions of management;
  • Identify organizational problems and the processes of decision making;
  • Describe the complexities associated with management of human resources in the organizations; and
  • Apply the knowledge in handling management complexities.
Introduction to Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Develop new contemporary thinking in entrepreneurship;
  • Exhibit attitude that promotes self-reliance;
  • Develop the desire for financial independence;
  • Demonstrate positive thinking and desire to make a difference in society; and
  • Appreciate the need and requirements for initiating economic or social ventures.
Principles of Economics2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify the basic concepts in economics including scarcity, choice, and scale of preference; basic laws of demand and supply;
  • Explain the nature of elasticity and its applications, as well as short and long-run production functions; and
  • Discuss pricing of factors of production and market structure consisting of perfect competitive market and imperfect competitive markets.
Use of Library, Study skills and ICT2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand the significance of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and its application to libraries and Information Services;
  • Acquire essential ICT skills for information professionals;
  • Understand data communication and internet resources in electronic storage systems, and explore web technology resources;
  • Learn the impact of ICT on modern libraries, along with ethical considerations and challenges related to applying ICT in library settings, particularly in the context of Nigerian libraries.
Business Statistics2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Analyze the statistical tools needed for measuring business performance;
  • Apply knowledge of statistics to business performance; and
  • Demonstrate the knowledge gained in conducting business research and market surveys.
Introduction to Computing3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain basic components of computers and other computing devices;
  • Describe the various applications of computers;
  • Explain information processing and its roles in society;
  • Describe the Internet, its various applications, and its impact;
  • Explain the different areas of the computing discipline and its specializations; and
  • Demonstrate practical skills in using computers and the internet.
Business Pitching2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Highlight the types of investors;
  • Understand the meaning of venture capital and the purpose of business pitch;
  • Explain the types of business pitching;
  • Develop and deliver an effective start-up business pitch;
  • Explain the merits and demerits of business pitching;
  • Describe the tips and basic skills needed for business pitching;
  • Create a persuasive and successful business pitch;
  • Understand the structure of a business pitch using the WHAC model (by Brandt Pividic) and the NABC model (by Stanford Research Institute); and
  • Write and present a successful business pitch to investors.

2nd SemesterUnits
Communication in English II2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Have a deepened understanding of communication skills both in spoken and written English;
  • Demonstrate an appreciable level of proficiency in the arts of public speaking, listening, and effective communication.
Nigerian People and Culture2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Analyze the historical foundation of the Nigerian culture and arts in pre-colonial times;
  • List and identify the major linguistic groups in Nigeria;
  • Explain the gradual evolution of Nigeria as a political unit;
  • Analyze the concepts of Trade, Economic, and Self-reliance status of the Nigerian peoples towards national development;
  • Enumerate the challenges of the Nigerian State towards Nation building;
  • Analyze the role of the Judiciary in upholding people’s fundamental rights;
  • Identify acceptable norms and values of the major ethnic groups in Nigeria; and
  • List and suggest possible solutions to identifiable Nigerian environmental, moral, and value problems.
Principles of Project Management2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define the concept and purpose of project management;
  • Identify the processes and actors in project management;
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of key project management methods;
  • Describe the tools and techniques used in project management;
  • Identify project bottlenecks and possible solutions.
Elements of Bookkeeping3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of bookkeeping and its relevance to business sustainability;
  • Appreciate why ventures fail due to poor record-keeping; and
  • Identify the required accounting records needed for small and growing ventures.
The Nigerian Entrepreneurial Environment2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Spot opportunities in the Nigerian key economic sectors;
  • Appreciate environmental challenges facing new ventures; and
  • Identify ways of overcoming binding constraints for businesses.
Basic Mathematics2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify the basic concepts of mathematics and demonstrate a preliminary understanding of mathematical applications in the field of management;
  • Perform basic computations in algebra, differential, and integral calculus;
  • Develop problem-solving skills from the mathematical ideas learned; and
  • Distinguish basic mathematics principles and their applications.
Basic Financial Literacy3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the world of money and how to stay liquid to avoid financial embarrassment;
  • Develop a savings and investment culture using legitimate means;
  • Be exposed to commodity and money markets where money circulates;
  • Appreciate inherent risks in financial transactions and how to mitigate/hedge financial risks;
  • Describe unethical practices in financial dealings and how to avoid illegal financial activities.
Technology Entrepreneurship2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define the basic terms such as technology adoption, innovation, and start-up scalability;
  • Enumerate four (4) theories associated with the concept of Technology adoption;
  • Describe four (4) principles of technology entrepreneurship and its dependence on other fields;
  • Define the following terms: Tech-Entrepreneurs, market penetration, and new product development;
  • Enumerate four (4) significance of technology adoption in Entrepreneurship;
  • Mention four (4) different approaches used in choosing an appropriate technology for use in entrepreneurship.

1st SemesterUnits
Entrepreneurship and Innovation2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the concepts and theories of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, opportunity seeking, new value creation, and risk-taking;
  • State the characteristics of an entrepreneur;
  • Analyze the importance of micro and small businesses in wealth creation, employment, and financial independence;
  • Engage in entrepreneurial thinking;
  • Identify key elements in innovation;
  • Describe stages in enterprise formation, partnership and networking including business planning;
  • Describe contemporary entrepreneurial issues in Nigeria, Africa and the rest of the world; and
  • State the basic principles of e-commerce.
Introduction to Entrepreneurial Financing2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • State the challenges of access to finance for micro and small enterprises;
  • Develop knowledge of conventional and contemporary sources of finance;
  • Gain exposure to financial architecture and financial decision-making process; and
  • Negotiate financial transactions with financiers and clients.
Entrepreneurial Marketing2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • State the importance of marketing to startups and small businesses;
  • Analyze traditional and technology-based methods of marketing new ventures and generating customers and clients;
  • Appreciate the challenges of marketing new products in the face of global competition; and
  • Explain strategies for communicating new products to existing and new markets, thereby creating an early mover advantage.
Theories of Entrepreneurship2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate why people undertake entrepreneurial ventures;
  • Differentiate types of entrepreneurial undertakings and entrepreneurial behavior;
  • Think about new ways to create social and economic value; and
  • Identify innovative solutions to existing and emerging challenges.
New Media Studies for Entrepreneurs3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define the following terms: virtual communities and media convergence;
  • Enumerate five applications of new media for entrepreneurial growth;
  • Mention five major relevance of new media services to organizational management;
  • Mention three ethical issues associated with media use in entrepreneurship;
  • Define Tele-sales, Tele-classrooms, tele-offices, and tele-advertising; and
  • Enumerate three contributions of social movements to media development.
Principles of Sustainable Development3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define basic terms such as sustainability, sustainable development, and environmental conservation;
  • Enumerate the four (4) dimensional theories of sustainability;
  • Describe four (4) sustainability practices that lead to environmental conservation;
  • Define biodiversity, ecosystem resilience, biodegradation, forest degradation, and ecosystem thresholds;
  • Mention four significance of biodiversity for forest resources management; and
  • Mention four advantages of sustainable development for entrepreneurial growth.
Business Communication Skills for Entrepreneurs2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify the important role of business communication in an organization;
  • Explain the barriers to communication; and
  • Describe the models and theories of communication.

2nd SemesterUnits
Philosophy, Logic and Human Existence2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Know the basic features of philosophy as an academic discipline;
  • Identify the main branches of philosophy & the centrality of logic in philosophical discourse;
  • Know the elementary rules of reasoning;
  • Distinguish between valid and invalid arguments;
  • Think critically and assess arguments in texts, conversations, and day-to-day discussions;
  • Critically asses the rationality or otherwise of human conduct under different existential conditions;
  • Develop the capacity to extrapolate and deploy expertise in logic to other areas of knowledge; and
  • Guide his or her actions, using the knowledge and expertise acquired in philosophy and logic.
Entrepreneurship and Change Management2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the need to be proactive in anticipating local and global environmental dynamics;
  • Spot opportunities in high-potential sectors regardless of geographical location; and
  • Identify strategies for managing opportunities and challenges in the ever-changing world of business.
Industrial Learning and Tours 13

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe the real-life business processes;
  • Exchange entrepreneurial ideas with captains of industry; and
  • Engage with mentors and receive handholding from entrepreneurs.
Biographical Studies of Entrepreneurial Thinkers and Giants3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify local and international entrepreneurs to drive inspiration;
  • Analyze critical success factors for entrepreneurs;
  • Appreciate challenges faced by entrepreneurial thinkers and Giant entrepreneurs;
  • Explain the methods, strategies, and networks used by entrepreneurs to mitigate risks and overcome challenges; and
  • List and explain attributes of entrepreneurs and social change agents.
Digital Economy2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define basic terms such as digital agriculture, digital manufacturing, and digital trade practices;
  • Enumerate four (4) importance of digital practices in entrepreneurial growth and unemployment reduction;
  • Describe four (4) theories and concepts of the digital divide, financial inclusion, market inclusion, and educational inclusion;
  • Define the following terms: digital data, digital privacy, and digital inclusion;
  • Mention four (4) significance of digital practices to entrepreneurial growth and unemployment reduction; and
  • Mention four (4) different uses of digital practices in governance and trade.
Digital Entrepreneurship2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define the following terms: Digital platforms, knowledge management, content management, content creation, and creative works;
  • Enumerate five (5) laws governing digital platforms in Nigeria;
  • Mention three (3) relevance of digital platforms to entrepreneurial growth;
  • Define the following: Technological adoption and technology transformation;
  • Mention five (5) applications of digital technology in entrepreneurial practices;
  • Define digital feedback services, digital business management, digital remote work flexibility, digital financial services, digital products, and digital currency.
Innovation Science2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the three (3) basic building blocks of STI;
  • Describe three (3) important aspects of policy making in STI;
  • Discuss three (3) significance of intellectual property in entrepreneurial development;
  • Explain five (5) usefulness of business design and innovation to entrepreneurial growth;
  • Mention two (2) important aspects of strategic innovation in new product development;
  • Discuss four (4) gender perspectives on STI;
  • Discuss two (2) principles of innovation and theories backing STI; and
  • Enumerate four (4) pillars of innovation theory.

1st SemesterUnits
Business Opportunity Scouting and Evaluation2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Spot diverse opportunities in the environment;
  • Appreciate opportunities in e-commerce;
  • Identify a viable business opportunity; and
  • Perform proof of concept and demonstrate market potential.
Sociology of Entrepreneurship2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the social factors/institutions that influence entrepreneurship;
  • Describe specific constraints of entrepreneurship in a traditional/developing society; and
  • Explain entrepreneurial traits and value orientations.
Small Scale Business Management2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Analyze the importance of small business in achieving inclusive growth in society;
  • Appreciate the requirements for establishing and managing micro and small enterprises;
  • Describe how to avoid business failures at start-up stage; and
  • Appreciate how to manage the transition to growth.
Green and Sustainable Entrepreneurship3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify three minimum criteria for measuring the level of green industrialization;
  • Explain two benefits of green industrialization to the Nigerian industrial sector;
  • Discuss the two policies necessary for green industrial growth in Nigeria;
  • Mention at least five significance of mineral resources management for entrepreneurial growth;
  • Enumerate three contemporary topical issues on green and sustainable entrepreneurship (GSE);
  • Discuss two (2) green and sustainable entrepreneurship agendas and the features of GSE using problem-solving skills of our resources; and
  • Mention five (5) different benefits of GSE practices for entrepreneurial development in Nigeria.
Digital Marketing for Entrepreneurs3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define digital marketing, digital marketing content management, and digital feedback channels;
  • Enumerate three (3) digital marketing regulations in Nigeria;
  • Mention five (5) relevance of digital marketing to entrepreneurial growth;
  • Define the following: influencer marketing, digital content management, and non-linear marketing methods;
  • Mention three (3) digital marketing strategies necessary for marketing success;
  • Define the following: blog and affiliate marketing, digital remote work flexibility, and digital marketing planning.
Financial Technology Studies3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define the following terms: Digital money, financial technology platforms, and digital wallets;
  • Mention five (5) advantages of financial technology in promoting financial inclusion;
  • List five (5) financial technology market players and their roles in Nigeria;
  • Enumerate three (3) risks new financial institutions pose to traditional financial institutions in Nigeria;
  • Define the following terms: digital banking, digital, traditional financial institutions, and digital credit system;
  • Mention three (3) laws governing financial technology use in Nigeria.

2nd SemesterUnits
Peace and Conflict Resolution2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Analyze the concepts of peace, conflict, and security;
  • List major forms, types, and root causes of conflict and violence;
  • Differentiate between conflict and terrorism;
  • Enumerate security and peace-building strategies; and
  • Describe the roles of international organizations, media, and traditional institutions in peace-building.
Venture Creation2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe the key steps in venture creation;
  • Spot opportunities in problems and high-potential sectors regardless of geographical location;
  • State how original products, ideas, and concepts are developed;
  • Develop business concepts for further incubation or pitching for funding;
  • Identify key sources of entrepreneurial finance;
  • Implement the requirements for establishing and managing micro and small enterprises;
  • Conduct entrepreneurial marketing and e-commerce;
  • Apply a wide variety of emerging technological solutions to entrepreneurship; and
  • Appreciate why ventures fail due to a lack of planning and poor implementation.
Family Business and Succession Plan2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the relevance and importance of family ventures;
  • Describe the challenges of initiating and running family ventures in a traditional society;
  • Appreciate the key success factors for managing family businesses; and
  • Demonstrate how traditional ventures can be transformed into global brands.
Feasibilities and Business Planning3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Analyze business viability using tried and testing models;
  • Prepare and pitch a bankable business plan for lenders and potential investors; and
  • Develop a disciplined approach to implementing business plans.
Research Methods3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Conduct basic research and perform business surveys;
  • Analyze and interpret research findings; and
  • Deploy relevant research findings and recommendations in business and management.
Industrial Learning and Tours II3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the dynamics of the entrepreneurial environment;
  • Interact with practitioners, customers, suppliers, stakeholders/shareholders to generate real-life experience; and
  • Enable students to obtain mentorship and build relationships.

1st SemesterUnits
Technology, Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Rights2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe how original products, ideas, and concepts are developed;
  • Explain the dimensions of technological innovations and how they enhance competitiveness;
  • Apply administrative, business, and legal processes to protect their innovation from the risk of piracy; and
  • Analyze profitable markets and innovations.
E-Business2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain modern business transitions and how to reach the global market;
  • Demonstrate how businesses are operated using e-commerce platforms; and
  • Explain the use of information and communication technology to network and build alliances.
Strategic Thinking, Problem Solving and Negotiation Skills2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe critical thinking and become ready to challenge the status quo;
  • Explain negotiation and approaches to innovative problem-solving;
  • Identify techniques for innovative solutions; and
  • Implement business dealings in a professional manner.
Disruptive and Emerging Technologies3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define the following terms: emerging technology, disruptive technology, and production shocks;
  • Enumerate three (3) advantages of leveraging technology to improve firm performance;
  • Mention five (5) relevance of technology to entrepreneurial growth;
  • Define the following: cultural shocks associated with technology, scalable growth and technology shocks;
  • Mention five (5) applications of technology in entrepreneurial practices;
  • Define the following: distributed ledger technology, blockchain technology, additive manufacturing and radical innovation.
Leadership and Organizational Management3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define leadership traits, leadership styles and organisational goals;
  • Enumerate five advantages of organisational values and culture for organisational growth;
  • Mention five (5) advantages of employee motivation for firm performance;
  • Define the following terms: work process, employee motivation and morale building;
  • Mention any 4 advantages of employee training for organisational performance; and
  • Enumerate 3 merits of organisational best practices for organisational performance.
Technology Hubs and Business Incubation3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define technology hubs, business incubation, and innovation habitats;
  • Enumerate five (5) advantages of technology hubs for start-up development;
  • Mention three (3) significances of business incubation for new business development;
  • Define start-up planning, start-up launching, start-up management and start-up growth;
  • Mention five (5) constraints to technology hub ecosystems in Nigeria; and
  • Define public incubators, seed accelerators, corporate accelerators, and start-up studios.

2nd SemesterUnits
Social Entrepreneurship and Community Development2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe ventures that are socially relevant;
  • Explain entrepreneurial attitude; and
  • Demonstrate how to fix identified challenges and needs in the community/society.
Management of Creativity and Innovation2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate their unique talents and how to think differently;
  • Be exposed to multi-dimensions of innovation;
  • Explain doing things differently in the business arena; and
  • Become prepared to succeed in the highly competitive world of business.
Entrepreneurship and Gender Issues2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the positive role of women in the socio-economic development of society;
  • Explain the binding constraints to women’s social and economic empowerment; and
  • Demonstrate an approach (social or economic enterprise) to help reduce the gender gap in their localities.
Risk Management and Insurance3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the inherent nature and types of business risks;
  • Analyse acceptable risks based on risk classifications;
  • Appreciate the role of insurance in mitigating business risks; and
  • Describe major categories of insurance policies.
Research for Enterprise4

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Develop a viable business concept that fits his/her interest;
  • Develop a prototype or bankable business plan; and
  • Explain business concepts, incubation, and pitching for funding.
Youth Entrepreneurship2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define basic concepts such as youth, entrepreneurship, youth entrepreneurship, etc.;
  • Understand the overview of youth entrepreneurship;
  • Mention major examples of youth entrepreneurship businesses;
  • Understand how to finance youth entrepreneurship in Nigeria; and
  • Understand the roles of various financial institutions in financing youth entrepreneurship in Nigeria and Africa.

2nd SemesterUnits
Social Entrepreneurship and Community Development2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe ventures that are socially relevant.
  • Explain entrepreneurial attitude.
  • Demonstrate how to fix identified challenges and needs in the community/society.
Management of Creativity and Innovation2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate their unique talents and how to think differently.
  • Be exposed to multi-dimensions of innovation.
  • Explain doing things differently in the business arena.
  • Become prepared to succeed in the highly competitive world of business.
Entrepreneurship and Gender Issues2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the positive role of women in the socio-economic development of society.
  • Explain the binding constraints to women’s social and economic empowerment.
  • Demonstrate an approach (social or economic enterprise) to help reduce the gender gap in their localities.
Risk Management and Insurance3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the inherent nature and types of business risks.
  • Analyze acceptable risks based on risk classifications.
  • Appreciate the role of insurance in mitigating business risks.
  • Describe major categories of insurance policies.
Research for Enterprise4

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Develop a viable business concept that fits his/her interest.
  • Develop a prototype or bankable business plan.
  • Explain business concepts, incubation, and pitching for funding.
Youth Entrepreneurship2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define basic concepts such as youth, entrepreneurship, youth entrepreneurship, etc.
  • Understand the overview of youth entrepreneurship.
  • Mention major examples of youth entrepreneurship businesses.
  • Understand how to finance youth entrepreneurship in Nigeria.
  • Understand the roles of various financing institutions in promoting youth entrepreneurship in Nigeria and Africa.
Current Issues in Digital Economy and Business (Elective)2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe the history of the internet.
  • Explain the potential impact of the digital economy.
  • Identify technologies for building digital business and manage their implementation.
  • Develop a digital business vision.
  • Categorize and analyze a variety of digital business models.
International Management (Elective)2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Develop comprehensive business strategies that encompass market entry, global operations, and sustainable growth in diverse cultural and economic contexts.
  • Apply knowledge of international management to navigate regulatory environments and cultural differences, identifying opportunities and mitigating risks in global business ventures.
  • Demonstrate leadership skills to effectively manage diverse global teams, leveraging cultural sensitivity and cross-cultural communication strategies to foster collaboration and achieve business objectives.
  • Apply entrepreneurial principles to innovate and adapt business models in response to changing global market dynamics, driving competitiveness and sustainable growth.
  • Develop and deliver compelling business plans and pitches that articulate strategic vision, market potential, financial viability, and scalability for international investors and stakeholders.

Admission Requirements

Entry Requirements for BSc. in Entrepreneurship

The entry requirements for a bachelor’s degree in Entrepreneurship at Miva Open University are stated below:

A copy of your O’Level result

The result must include a minimum of five credits in the following subjects in not more than two sittings:

Please note that submission of Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) results is not mandatory at this stage. However, upon admission to the university, the provided results will be thoroughly verified for authenticity and compliance with the stated criteria, including JAMB Regularisation.

Careers

Potential roles for BSc. Entrepreneurship degree holders​

Career Options

Graduates of our BSc. Entrepreneurship programme can pursue a wide array of rewarding career paths in the entrepreneurial landscape, including:

Tuition

Payment Plans

Miva Open University offers a flexible payment plan for its degree programmes. You may choose to pay the year’s fee or per semester.

Tuition Per Semester

Pay Per Semester. No hidden charges. No additional costs.

₦150,000

Discount applies for full year’s payment.

Tuition Per Session

Pay Per Session. No hidden charges. No additional costs.

₦300,000

₦280,000

Discount applies for full year’s payment.