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Admission for the May 2024 academic session closes May 6th. Apply Now!

School of Computing

BSc. Cybersecurity

This programme is designed to prepare individuals for careers in the field of cybersecurity, which focuses on protecting computer systems, networks, and data from unauthorised access, attacks, and threats.

ADMISSION OPTIONS

ADMISSION OPTIONS

Tuition Per Session

₦350,000

₦320,000

Tuition Per Semester

₦175,000

Introduction to Cybersecurity

Start your bachelor’s degree in Cybersecurity

Our Bachelor’s in Cybersecurity programme is crafted to equip you with the knowledge and skills necessary for a successful career in the field. With a strong emphasis on theoretical foundations and practical applications, this programme prepares you to tackle the complex challenges of cybersecurity in today’s digital landscape. In this course, you will learn cybersecurity fundamentals, network security, cryptography, and data protection.

As a graduate, you will be well-prepared to pursue diverse professional pathways in cyber security, safeguarding digital systems and data from emerging threats, and ensuring the integrity and confidentiality of information.

Our faculty members are knowledgeable, accomplished, and experienced in their fields. They bring a wealth of knowledge and real-world insights into the classroom. Their diverse backgrounds, ranging from industry leaders to seasoned academics, enrich the learning experience by providing practical perspectives and cutting-edge research. By learning from these esteemed faculty members, you will be inspired to think critically, develop innovative solutions, and excel in the ever-evolving landscape of cybersecurity.

Why you should apply;

Applications for May 2024 admission is ongoing.

Apply before 6th May 2024, to secure your place. Discount applies for full year’s payment.

Programme Summary

Study Level

BSc. Cybersecurity

Study Duration

8 Semesters

Mode of study

Blended Learning

Tuition per session

₦350,000

₦320,000

Tuition per semester

₦175,000

Curriculum

Programme Outline

Our curriculum is designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in a variety of careers in the tech industry. The programme covers a wide range of topics, including programming, data structures, algorithms, operating systems, and artificial intelligence.

The faculty is available to students through forums, email, and phone calls. Students also have access to a variety of resources, including a state-of-the-art e-library, virtual computer labs, a career center, and a variety of student organisations.

1st Semester Units
Communication in English I 2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify possible sound patterns in English;
  • List notable Language skills, classify word formation processes;
  • Construct simple and fairly complex sentences in English;
  • Apply logical and critical reasoning skills for meaningful presentations;
  • Demonstrate an appreciable level of the art of public speaking and listening; and
  • Write simple and technical reports.
Elementary Mathematics I – Algebra and Trigonometry 2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand the basic definitions of Set, Subset, Union, Intersection, Complements, and use of Venn diagrams;
  • Solve quadratic equations;
  • Solve trigonometric functions;
  • Understand various types of numbers; and
  • Solve some problems using the Binomial theorem.
General Physics I – Mechanics 2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify and deduce the physical quantities and their units;
  • Differentiate between vectors and scalars;
  • Describe and evaluate the motion of systems on the basis of the fundamental laws of mechanics;
  • Apply Newton’s laws to describe and solve simple problems of motion;
  • Evaluate work, energy, velocity, momentum, acceleration, and torque of moving or rotating objects;
  • Explain and apply the principles of conservation of energy, linear and angular momentum;
  • Describe the laws governing motion under gravity;
  • Explain motion under gravity, and quantitatively determine the behavior of objects moving under gravity.
General Practical Physics I 1

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Conduct measurements of some physical quantities;
  • Make observations of events, collect and tabulate data;
  • Identify and evaluate some common experimental errors;
  • Plot and analyze graphs; and
  • Draw conclusions from numerical and graphical analysis of data.
Use of Library, Study Skills and ICT 2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand the significance of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and its application to libraries and Information Services;
  • Acquire essential ICT skills for information professionals, understand data communication and internet resources in electronic storage systems, and explore web technology resources;
  • Learn the impact of ICT on modern libraries, along with ethical considerations and challenges related to applying ICT in library settings, particularly in the context of Nigerian libraries.
Descriptive Statistics 3

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the basic concepts of descriptive statistics.
  • Present data in graphs and charts.
  • Differentiate between measures of location, dispersion and partition.
  • Describe the basic concepts of Skewness and Kurtosis as well as their utility function in a given data set.
  • Differentiate rates from ratios and how they are used.
  • Compute the different types of index numbers from a given data set and interpret the output.
  • Understand and apply frequency distributions to organize and summarize data, create and interpret various types of charts and graphs to visualize data effectively, compute and interpret measures of central tendency to identify the center of a distribution, calculate and interpret measures of dispersion to understand the spread of data points, compare and contrast different approaches to probability, calculate and interpret conditional probabilities to make informed decisions based on given conditions, identify and work with probability distributions in the discrete case, including Bernoulli, Binomial, Uniform, Poisson, Geometric, and Hypergeometric distributions, analyze continuous probability distributions, such as Uniform, Normal, and Exponential distributions.
Introduction to Computing Sciences 3

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Explain basic components of computers and other computing devices;
  • Describe the various applications of computers;
  • Explain information processing and its roles in the society;
  • Describe the Internet, its various applications and its impact;
  • Explain the different areas of the computing discipline and its specializations; and
  • Demonstrate practical skills on using computers and the internet.
Environmental and Sustainability (Elective) 2

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Grasp environmental studies’ fundamental principles, human-environment relationships, and the impact of human activities on nature.
  • Examine energy resource usage and its environmental consequences, and investigate chemicals and waste effects on ecosystems and health.
Contemporary Health Issues (Elective) 2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Outline contemporary health issues and broadly classify them.
  • Discuss some basic concepts related to clinical medicine, disease prevention/management, and population health.
  • Explain the aetiology, prevention, and management of key non-communicable diseases.
  • Discuss the epidemiology, personal and public health consequences of selected infectious diseases.
  • Discuss the personal and social determinants of health.
  • Explain the place of disease prevention and health promotion in personal and population health.
  • Explain the connection between contemporary health issues and sustainable development goals.
  • Relate contemporary health issues to global health challenges.
2nd Semester Units
Introduction to Problem Solving 3
At the end of this course, students should be able to:
  • Explain problem-solving processes.
  • Demonstrate problem-solving skills.
  • Describe the concept of algorithms development and properties of algorithms.
  • Discuss the solution techniques of solving problems.
  • Solve computer problems using algorithms, flowcharts, pseudocode; etc.
  • Solve problems using programming languages like C, PYTHON, etc.
Nigerian People and Culture 2
At the end of the course, students should be able to:
  • Analyze the historical foundation of Nigerian culture and arts in pre-colonial times.
  • List and identify the major linguistic groups in Nigeria.
  • Explain the gradual evolution of Nigeria as a political unit.
  • Analyze the concepts of trade, economic, and self-reliance status of the Nigerian people towards national development.
  • Enumerate the challenges of the Nigerian State towards nation-building.
  • Analyze the role of the Judiciary in upholding people’s fundamental rights.
  • Identify acceptable norms and values of the major ethnic groups in Nigeria.
  • List and suggest possible solutions to identifiable Nigerian environmental, moral, and value problems.
Elementary Mathematics II – Calculus 2
By the end of the course, students will be able to:
  • Differentiate and explain rules in calculus.
  • Analyze real-variable functions and graphs.
  • Grasp limits and continuity.
  • Understand derivatives as the rate of change limits and gain proficiency in integration techniques and definite integrals for solving area and volume problems.
General Physics II – Electricity & Magnetism 2
At the end of this course, students should be able to:
  • Describe and determine the magnetic field for steady and moving charges.
  • Determine the magnetic properties of simple current distributions using Biot-Savart and Ampere’s law.
  • Describe electromagnetic induction and related concepts and make calculations using Faraday and Lenz’s laws.
  • Explain the basic physical of Maxwell’s equations in integral form and evaluate DC circuits to determine the electrical parameters and the characteristics of AC voltages and currents in resistors, capacitors, and inductors.
General Practical Physics II 1
At the end of this course, students should be able to:
  • Conduct experiments on the measurements of some physical quantities.
  • Make observations of events.
  • Collect and tabulate data.
  • Identify and evaluate some common experimental errors.
  • Plot and analyze graphs and finally draw conclusions from numerical and graphical analysis of data.
Communication in English II 2
At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
  • Have a deepened understanding of communication skills both in spoken and written English.
  • Demonstrate an appreciable level of proficiency in the arts of public speaking, listening, and effective communication.
Introduction to Web Technologies 3
On completion of this course, students will have:
  • Basic knowledge and skills required for planning, designing, and developing effective web pages with a focus on the practical application of the technologies used in web development.
  • Basic skills in tools like HTML5, Cascading Style Sheet (CSS), and Javascript.
  • Ability to host a website on a selected web server.
  • Skills in web content development.

1st SemesterUnits
Entrepreneurship and Innovation2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the concepts, characteristics, and theories of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, opportunity seeking, new value creation, and risk-taking.
  • Analyze the importance of micro and small businesses in wealth creation, employment, and financial independence.
  • Engage in entrepreneurial thinking.
  • Identify key elements in innovation and describe the stages in enterprise formation, partnership, and networking, including business planning.
  • State the basic principles of e-commerce.
Computer Programming I3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify different programming paradigms and their approaches to programming.
  • Write programs in C using basic data types and strings.
  • Design and implement programming problems using selection.
  • Design and implement programming problems using loops and use & implement classes as data abstractions in an object-oriented approach.
  • Implement simple exception handling in programs, develop programs with input/output from text files and design and implement programming problems involving arrays.
Discrete Structures2

At the end of this course, students will have:

  • Skills to convert logical statements from informal language to propositional and predicate logic expressions.
  • Described the strengths and limitations of propositional and predicate logic and outline the basic structure of each proof technique to be described.
  • Ability to apply each of the proof techniques correctly in the construction of a sound argument, apply the pigeonhole principle in the context of a formal proof and compute permutations and combinations of a set, and interpret the meaning in the context of the particular application.
  • Ability to map real-world applications to appropriate counting formalisms subject to constraints on the seating arrangement and solve a variety of basic recurrence relations.
Linear Algebra I2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.
  • Apply these concepts to solve mathematical problems.
Introduction to Software Engineering

At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

  • Describe the concept of the software life cycle.
  • Explain the phases of requirements analysis.
  • Design, development, testing, and maintenance in a typical software life cycle.
  • Differentiate amongst the various software development models.
  • Utilize Unified Modeling Language for object-oriented analysis and design.
  • Describe different design architectures.
  • Explain the various tasks involved in software project management.
  • Describe the basic legal issues related to Software Engineering.
Introduction to Cybersecurity and Strategy2

At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

  • Exhibit the ability to articulate cybersecurity concepts, methods, terminologies, and elements.
  • List and explain common cyber-attacks, threats, challenges, and solutions.
  • Apply techniques for identifying, detecting, and defending against cybersecurity threats, safeguarding information assets, and assessing the impact of cybersecurity on various institutions and applications.
  • Recognize the methods and motives of cybersecurity incident perpetrators, the countermeasures employed by organizations and agencies, and the ethical obligations of security professionals.
  • Evaluate cybersecurity and national security strategies and define evolving cybersecurity requirements and strategies to mitigate significant risks.
Cybercrime, Law and Countermeasures2

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Discuss various cybercrimes, including computer crimes, internet fraud, e-commerce issues, and threats to national infrastructure.
  • Give insights into global policies, legal matters, investigative techniques, and enforcement implications related to cybercrime.
  • Analyze the cyber law of Nigeria and other countries, understanding the associated penalties.
  • Describe the application of cyber law at both international and national levels, offering examples from different continents by comparing Nigeria’s cyber law framework and countermeasures to other nations.
  • Identify challenges and opportunities in the enforcement of cyber law within the country.
SIWES I3

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Evaluate their understanding of cybersecurity concepts, their practical application, preventive measures, and the protection of the cyber environment.
  • Articulate the functioning of a typical cybersecurity unit/department within an organization, detailing the various assignments performed and the skills acquired during the SIWES period (Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme).
  • Produce a comprehensive report summarizing the knowledge gained and the experiences encountered throughout the training, demonstrating their proficiency in the field of cybersecurity.

2nd SemesterUnits
Philosophy, Logic and Human Existence2

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Provide a survey of the main branches of Philosophy, Symbolic Logic, and Special symbols in symbolic Logic-conjunction, negation, affirmation, disjunction, equivalent and conditional statements law of thought.
  • Understand the method of deduction using rules of inference and bi-conditionals qualification theory; Types of discourse, Nature of arguments, Validity and soundness; Techniques for evaluating arguments, and Distinction between inductive and deductive inferences.
Computer Programming II3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Develop solutions for a range of problems using object-oriented programming in C++.
  • Use modules/packages/namespaces for program organization.
  • Use API in writing applications.
  • Apply divide and conquer strategy to searching and sorting problems using iterative and/or recursive solutions and explain the concept of exceptions in programming and how to handle exceptions in programs.
  • Write simple multithreaded applications and design and implement simple GUI applications.
Computer Architecture and Organisation2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain different instruction formats, such as addresses per instruction and variable length vs. fixed length formats.
  • Describe the organization of the classical von Neumann machine and its major functional units.
  • Explain how subroutine calls are handled at the assembly level.
  • Describe the basic concepts of interrupts and I/O operations.
  • Write simple assembly language program segments.
  • Show how fundamental high-level programming constructs are implemented at the machine-language level.
  • Compare alternative implementations of data paths.
  • Discuss the concept of control points and the generation of control signals using hardwired or micro-programmed implementations.
Systems Analysis Design3

At the end of this course, student should be able to:

  • Describe system requirements gathering techniques.
  • Describe data modeling technique (entity relationship modeling).
  • Describe process modeling technique (data flow diagram).
  • Describe system architectural design, process, and database design.
  • Describe user interface design.
Linear Algebra II2

At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Master linear algebra concepts, including solving linear equations, change of basis, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, Caley-Hamilton theorem, symmetric matrices, positive definite matrices, and orthogonal diagonalization.
  • Confidently use similar matrices, linear transformations, singular value decomposition, and orthogonal projections.
  • Apply orthonormal bases and the Gram-Schmidt process effectively, making them adept at handling various mathematical problems and real-world applications.
Introduction to Computer Networks3

Upon completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Have gained a comprehensive understanding of computer networks, with a specific focus on Internet architecture and protocols.
  • Explain layered network architectures, addressing, naming, forwarding, routing, communication reliability, and the client-server model.
  • Exhibit practical experience through programming exercises involving reduced versions of real Internet protocols, complementing the theoretical foundations learned.
  • Design, analyze, and troubleshoot computer networks.
  • Implement and optimize various Internet protocols.
  • Navigate complex network environments, ensuring effective communication and data transfer, making them competent network professionals.
1st Semester Units
Data Structures 3

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of fundamental programming concepts and data structures in C++ such as primitive types, arrays, records, strings, and string processing.
  • Have a solid grasp of data representation in memory and be able to effectively allocate memory on the stack and heap.
  • Be proficient in implementing and applying various data structures including queues and trees, utilizing appropriate implementation strategies.
  • Be skilled in managing run-time storage effectively through pointers and references, and adept at working with linked structures.
  • Gain practical experience in writing C++ functions and implementing algorithms for arrays, records, string processing, queues, trees, pointers, and linked structures, further enhancing their proficiency in C++ programming and data structure manipulation.
Artificial Intelligence 2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Explain AI fundamentals, concepts, goals, types, techniques, branches, applications, AI technology and tools.
  • Discuss intelligent agents, their performance, examples, faculties, environment and architectures, and determine the characteristics of a given problem that an intelligent system must solve.
  • Describe the Turing test and the “Chinese Room” thought experiment, and differentiate between the concepts of optimal reasoning/behaviour and human-like reasoning/behaviour.
  • Describe the role of heuristics and the trade-offs among completeness, optimality, time complexity, and space complexity.
  • Analyze the types of search and their applications in AI and describe the problem of combinatorial explosion of search space and its consequences.
  • Demonstrate knowledge representation, semantic network and frames along with their applicable uses.
  • Practice Natural Language Processing, translate a natural language (e.g., English) sentence into a predicate logic statement, convert a logic statement into clause form, apply resolution to a set of logic statements to answer a query; and
  • Analyze programming languages for AI and expert systems technology, and employ application domains of AI.
Cryptography Techniques, Algorithms and Applications 2

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define various cryptography means, simple and complex cryptosystems, and differentiate between symmetric and asymmetric cryptography.
  • Exhibit practical experience in cryptanalysis, utilizing protocols, hashing, digital signatures, and certificates.
  • Examine certificate authorities, policies, and procedures for proper cryptography usage in secure systems.
  • Identify and understand public-key cryptography, discrete algorithms, and cryptographic mathematical concepts, including hash functions, data integrity, authentication, algorithmic number theory, primality testing, and true primality testing.
  • Discuss factoring integers, RSA encryption, RSA key generation security, and discrete logarithm cryptographic schemes.
Cybersecurity Risks Analysis, Challenges and Mitigation 2

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe cybersecurity risks, preventive measures, and challenges, while proposing strategies for the future.
  • Apply decision and risk analysis techniques to mitigate cybersecurity vulnerabilities and devise effective assessments for risk mitigation in the cloud.
  • Discuss the implications of information technology on national development, cyber-attacks, and the safety of information, considering economic and geopolitical factors affecting African countries.
  • Review information security principles and applied management, including governance, security policy, threat and vulnerability management, crisis response, and legal considerations.
  • Explore ISO 27000 series, incident response, forensics, and dealing with classified data and regulatory drivers.
Digital Forensics and Investigation Methods 2

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Build a foundational understanding of digital forensics and digital evidence, with an awareness of the challenges involved.
  • Evaluate the cyber trail and its complexities.
  • Review the development of investigative tools and the language of computer crime investigation, and recognize the role of computers in criminal activities, technology, and law.
  • Explore techniques and tools used in computer forensics investigations and apply best practices in securing, processing, acquiring, examining, and reporting digital evidence using contemporary technologies and methodologies in forensic investigations.
System and Network Administration 2

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of system administration, focusing on the fundamental architecture shared across various systems.
  • Radicalise on UNIX/LINUX, requiring a working knowledge of Linux for optimal understanding.
  • Demonstrate skills, methodologies, and competencies necessary to effectively manage computer systems within an organizational infrastructure, including hardware, software, and user administration.
  • Showcase expertise in user, device, and file system administration, as well as computer and network security, system monitoring, administrative support tools, and network, server, and client administration.
  • Proficiently handle diverse system administration tasks in real-world scenarios.
SIWES II 3

Upon completing this Student Industrial Work Experience Scheme II (SIWES II) students will

  • Have the ability to articulate and describe the diverse assignments undertaken and the skills acquired throughout the training period.
  • Be proficient in preparing and submitting a comprehensive report documenting the knowledge gained and the experiences encountered during the exercise.
  • Showcase valuable hands-on experience in real-world settings, enhancing their practical skills, and preparing them for their future professional endeavors.
2nd Semester Units
Peace and Conflict Resolution 2

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Analyse the concepts of peace, conflict and security;
  • List major forms, types and root causes of conflict and violence;
  • Differentiate between conflict and terrorism;
  • Enumerate security and peacebuilding strategies; and
  • Describe roles of international organisations, media and traditional institutions in peacebuilding.
Venture Creation 2

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Identify business opportunities in Nigeria through environmental scanning and market research, considering social, climate, and technological factors;
  • Understand entrepreneurial finance options like venture capital, equity finance, microfinance, and small business investment organisations;
  • Grasp the principles of marketing, customer acquisition, and retention, as well as e-commerce models (B2B, C2C, B2C), learning from successful e-commerce companies;
  • Acquire skills in small business management, family business dynamics, negotiation, and modern business communication methods; and
  • Demonstrate their ability to generate business ideas and explore emerging technologies for market solutions and digital business strategies.
Operating Systems 3

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Recognize operating system types and structures;
  • Describe OS support for processes and threads;
  • Recognize CPU scheduling, synchronisation, and deadlock;
  • Resolve OS issues related to synchronisation and failure for distributed systems;
  • Explain OS support for virtual memory, disk scheduling, I/O, and file systems;
  • Identify security and protection issues in computer systems; and
  • Use C and Unix commands, examine behavior and performance of Linux, and develop various system programs under Linux to make use of OS concepts related to process synchronization, shared memory, mailboxes, file systems, etc.
Biometrics Security 2

Upon completing this course, students will have the ability to:

  • Discuss and apply various biometric algorithms and data analysis techniques, including digital image/signal processing.
  • Display proficiency in automated biometric identification for hands, fingers, palms, heads, face, voice, eyes, and other biometrics.
  • Develop methods for obtaining and matching biometric data, enabling them to practice biometric authentication, enrolment, and matching performance assessment, including setting thresholds, calculating error rates, and graph analysis.
  • Showcase skills in handling storage, quality, upgrades, security, and integrity of biometric data elements. Privacy issues, security strength, recognition rates, and applications of biometrics, passwords, smart cards, as well as exploration of future trends, will be thoroughly examined.
Information and Big Data Security 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Possess a comprehensive understanding of the foundations of big data, encompassing computing technology and statistics.
  • Explore the technical challenges and statistical assumptions underpinning relationship understanding in diverse applied fields, with a specific focus on fraud detection and communication monitoring.
  • Critically engage with the social implications of increased knowledge, surveillance, and behavioral prediction enabled by big data, addressing ethical tradeoffs.
  • Master the principles and practices of utilizing big data to enhance computing system security.
  • Apply these principles through real-world examples, utilizing novel datasets to provide practical insights into big data applications.
Software Defined Networking and Content Delivery Networks 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Gain comprehensive knowledge about software-defined networking (SDN) and its transformative impact on communication network management, maintenance, and security.
  • Understand the fundamentals of content delivery networks (CDN), exploring the infrastructure that facilitates the rapid delivery of static web content, rich digital media, and various data to a global audience of employees, vendors, partners, and customers while minimizing time and cost.
  • Be well-equipped to navigate and implement cutting-edge technologies in SDN and CDN, enabling them to optimize network performance, enhance data delivery, and contribute to the efficient and secure operation of modern communication networks.
Network Perimeter Security 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Have a thorough understanding of perimeter security in cybersecurity, specifically focusing on safeguarding a company’s network boundaries against hackers, intruders, and unauthorized individuals.
  • Learn about various defence mechanisms, such as surveillance detection, pattern analysis, threat recognition, and implementing effective response strategies.
  • Be equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary for designing and implementing network perimeter security measures, ensuring the protection of sensitive data and resources within an organization.
  • Be prepared to proactively address cybersecurity threats and contribute to creating secure and resilient network infrastructures.
Cybersecurity Innovation and New Technologies 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Acquire a profound comprehension of the significant role entrepreneurship plays in driving transformative social and economic changes within the cyber-driven society of today.
  • Understand how innovative applications of novel technologies in cyber security contribute to companies’ success and protection.
  • Gain insights into various business models, identifying entrepreneurial opportunities through data analytics.
  • Be equipped to describe business plans and the startup process, evaluate business feasibility, and strategize marketing approaches.
  • Engage in discussions about business ethics and legal considerations, developing a well-rounded understanding of the intricate interplay between entrepreneurship, innovation, and cyber-driven business environments.
1st Semester Units
Research Methodology and Technical Report Writing 3

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Distinguish qualitative and quantitative research methodologies and their applications;
  • Identify and define a research problem in a given area;
  • Identify different methods of data collection and select the methods appropriate to a given situation;
  • Design and conduct simple research including analysis and interpretation of research results;
  • Document research problem, methodology all the way to research report writing;
  • Defend the written research report; and
  • Familiarize themselves with ethical issues in the conduct of research.
Systems Vulnerability Assessment and Testing 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Gain a comprehensive introduction to vulnerability assessment and penetration testing methodologies, along with proficiency in using software tools for these mechanisms.
  • Develop a thorough understanding of key concepts and topics in vulnerability assessment and penetration testing, including the vulnerability assessment process, host and network scanning techniques, principles of penetration testing, and various techniques for network security, software security, web security, and mobile security.
  • Be equipped to apply these methodologies and tools to assess and test the security of various systems, preparing them for practical applications in identifying and addressing vulnerabilities in cybersecurity environments.
Project Management 2

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Acquire comprehensive knowledge and understanding of project management, including planning, scheduling, and resource utilization.
  • Be adept at efficiently managing project resources, making procurement decisions, and effectively monitoring and executing projects with excellent communication and time management skills.
  • Be prepared to successfully lead and oversee projects, ensuring their timely and successful completion.
  • Be equipped with the necessary skills to handle project complexities, adapt to changing circumstances, and make informed decisions to achieve project goals.
  • Be prepared for real-world project management scenarios, enabling them to excel in managing and delivering successful projects.
Final Year Project I 3

Upon completing the first part of the final year project, students will:

  • Have developed the essential skills to embark on a research-oriented project in Cyber Security.
  • Be proficient in identifying researchable project topics and conducting a comprehensive literature review relevant to the identified problem statement, demonstrating proper acknowledgment and referencing of information sources.
  • Conceptualize and design a well-structured research methodology to address the identified problem, determining appropriate data analysis tools aligned with research objectives.
  • Be able to write a coherent and compelling proposal for the research project, showcasing their ability to present their ideas effectively in both written and oral formats.
  • Be prepared for the subsequent phases of their final year project, equipping them to undertake rigorous and meaningful research in Cyber Security.
Cyber Threat Intelligence and Cyber Conflict 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Possess the expertise to effectively detect, respond to, and combat organized cybercrimes and cyberwar activities, recognizing the limitations of preventing every attack in the current cyber security landscape.
  • Be skilled in analyzing successful and unsuccessful advanced persistent threats and malware campaigns, equipping them to combat cyber terrorism and terrorist tactics on a global scale.
  • Gain in-depth knowledge of cyber threat intelligence and cyber tactical threat intelligence, enabling them to evaluate the role and skills of a cyber threat intelligence analyst.
  • Be able to identify the evolution of counterterrorism and cyber conflict, providing them with a comprehensive understanding of the dynamic and constantly evolving nature of these domains.
Ethical Hacking and Reverse Engineering 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of Ethical Hacking and Reverse Engineering methodologies and techniques, catering to the growing interest in internet security and personal safety.
  • Be proficient in ethical hacking techniques, learning how to safeguard their security from potential threats.
  • Acquire the essential skills for reverse engineering, enabling them to gain valuable insights into engineering devices and systems.
  • Develop hands-on experience in both areas, enhancing their ability to apply these techniques effectively.
  • Be equipped with practical knowledge and expertise in Ethical Hacking and Reverse Engineering, empowering them to address cybersecurity challenges and engineering complexities in real-world scenarios.
Information Security and Data Management 2

Upon completing this training, students will:

  • Possess the knowledge and skills required to address information security, interoperability, and data management concerns in modern technological contexts.
  • Learn how to implement best practices and standards for information security and data management, ensuring appropriate privacy measures and effective communication between agencies.
  • Be equipped to resolve vulnerabilities and improve security skills within organizations’ business operations, technological assets, and management.
  • Be able to proactively address information security challenges and promote effective data management, safeguarding sensitive information and enhancing overall organizational efficiency and privacy protection.
2nd Semester Units
Ethics and Legal Issues in Cyber Security 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of state laws and regulations concerning ethics in Cyber Security, along with the ability to identify and explain relevant codes of ethics in the field.
  • Explore and analyze social and ethical issues in various Cyber Security domains, reviewing real-life ethical cases to develop ethical resolutions and policies.
  • Comprehend the consequences of disregarding and non-compliance with ethical provisions.
  • Acquire skills in developing a sound methodology to effectively resolve ethical conflicts and crises, equipping them to navigate complex ethical dilemmas with professionalism and integrity.
  • Be prepared to uphold ethical standards and promote ethical practices in the dynamic field of Cyber Security.
Machine Learning 3

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Have a comprehensive understanding of machine learning as a subfield of artificial intelligence, with a focus on algorithms enabling computers to learn and adapt from empirical data.
  • Be proficient in the theoretical foundations of machine learning and various concrete algorithms, including decision tree learning, artificial neural networks, Bayesian learning, and support vector machines.
  • Be able to develop programming skills and the ability to apply machine learning algorithms to real-world data sets, enabling them to analyze and interpret data effectively.
  • Be able to implement machine learning techniques in practical applications, harnessing the power of algorithms to extract valuable insights from data.
Deep and Dark Web Security 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Gain a thorough understanding of the deep and dark web, a hidden aspect representing over 90% of internet content.
  • Learn how activists, hacktivists, nation-states, researchers, and those seeking anonymity utilize this domain.
  • Acquire the skills to navigate the dark corners of the web, exposing them to unique perspectives on security, safety, reliability, and privacy.
  • Have the essential knowledge for Cybersecurity professionals, enabling them to detect threats, protect themselves from malicious activity, and leverage the dark web for anonymity and privacy protection.
  • Be prepared to operate effectively in the cybersecurity landscape, equipped with the expertise to confront the challenges and opportunities presented by the deep and dark web.
Final Year Project II 3

Upon completing the second part of the final year project, students will:

  • Showcase their proficiency in generic transferable and technical skills in Cyber Security, including effective communication and teamwork.
  • Demonstrate their abilities by producing a comprehensive technical report in their chosen project area, addressing real-world cybersecurity challenges.
  • Be skilled in defending their written project report, showcasing their understanding and application of research methodologies.
  • Gain valuable insights into carrying out full-fledged research, appreciating the complexities and nuances involved in cybersecurity projects.
  • Be prepared to excel in professional settings, equipped with essential skills and knowledge in Cyber Security research and practice.
Steganography: Access Methods and Data Hiding 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of steganography, a valuable technique employed in today’s security-conscious environment to hide sensitive information and stay ahead of hackers and data thieves.
  • Explore the concept of steganography, learning about the various techniques it entails and its practical applications in modern cybersecurity efforts.
  • Develop proficiency in implementing encryption methods that enable communication through concealed information.
  • Be equip to leverage steganography effectively, enhancing their ability to protect sensitive data and communication channels from unauthorized access.
  • Be better equipped to contribute to robust cybersecurity measures in real-world scenarios.
Cloud Computing Security 2

Upon completing this course, students will:

  • Acquire comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cloud landscape, including architectural principles, techniques, design patterns, and real-world best practices for both cloud service providers and consumers.
  • Grasp the essentials of delivering secure cloud-based services, encompassing cloud security architecture, guiding security design principles, industry standards, applied technologies, and regulatory compliance requirements.
  • Be equipped to design, implement, deliver, and manage secure cloud-based services, ensuring data protection and maintaining the integrity of cloud environments.
  • Be prepared to navigate the complexities of cloud security, enabling them to contribute effectively to the development and management of secure and resilient cloud infrastructures in various industry settings.
Zero Trust Networking 2

Upon completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Develop a comprehensive understanding of Zero Trust networks and their implementation.
  • Explain key concepts and best practices, including the principle of “never trust, always verify” and the use of multi-factor authentication, enabling them to create a secure network environment resilient to cyber threats.
  • Explain technical, management, and organizational aspects of Zero Trust, empowering students to effectively deploy this security model in various settings.
  • Explain how to use Zero Trust to comply with regulations and industry standards, ensuring adherence to security protocols.
  • Give insights into the latest threats and vulnerabilities, they will be prepared to leverage Zero Trust to protect against emerging cyber risks.

Admission Requirements

100 Level Entry Requirements for BSc. in Cybersecurity

Here’s what you need to study for a bachelor’s programme at Miva Open University

A copy of your O’Level result

The result must include a minimum of five credits in the following subjects in not more than two sittings:

Please note that submission of Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) results is not mandatory at this stage. However, upon admission to the university, the provided results will be thoroughly verified for authenticity and compliance with the stated criteria, including JAMB Regularisation.

Direct Entry Admission Requirements for BSc. in Cybersecurity

Here’s what you need to study for a bachelor’s programme at Miva Open University

Direct Entry Candidates must meet ‘O’ Level requirements for the programme:

Careers

Potential roles for BSc. Cybersecurity degree holders​

Career Options

Learn on your terms with pre-recorded engaging and interactive videos on your educational journey for flexible, convenient, and self-paced study.

Tuition

Payment Plans

Miva Open University offers a flexible payment plan for its degree programmes. You may choose to pay the year’s fee or per semester.

Tuition Per Semester

Pay Per Semester. No hidden charges. No additional costs.

₦175,000

Discount applies for full year’s payment.

Tuition Per Session

Pay Per Session. No hidden charges. No additional costs.

₦350,000

₦320,000

Discount applies for full year’s payment.